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Released: Apache OpenOffice 4.1.10

Abstracts of Conference Papers - Thursday

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Marketing OpenOffice.org in your country
Nick Richards Co-Lead OpenOffice.org Marketing Project
An overview of the past years progress expanding into how to engage disparate national communities with OpenOffice.org. Hints on who to talk to, why you'd want to talk to them and suchlike. A seminar where 'best practice' is shared.
Biography: Nick Richards is the Marketing Project Co-Lead at OpenOffice.org. This means he gets in the way of programmers, asks lots of questions and talks too much. He is in the final year of a History degree at King's College London.

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Migrating from Microsoft Office to Openoffice.org/StarOffice
Frank Gamerdinger Product Specialist Desktop solutions, Sun Microsystems, Germany, 85551 Kirchheim-Heimstetten, Germany
This session will discuss issues in migrating from Microsoft Office to OpenOffice.org/StarOffice.
An general overview of a migration project will be given and some possible migration scenarios are covered. The presentation will also discuss technical details faced during migration.
Biography: Frank Gamerdinger has worked in the IT industry for XXX years. He has been a Java software developer and freelance IT consultant and has written articles for the German computer press.Joining Sun Microsystems 4 years ago, he is now one if the StarOffice product specialists in the Desktop Solutions group, assisting strategic StarOffice and desktop pilots.

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Where do we go from here? The future of OpenOffice.org
Louis Suarez-Potts Community Manager, CollabNet
OpenOffice.org was conceived nearly three years ago with the desire to join what seemed, in the late 90s, to be a movement that would permanently change the way software was produced. CollabNet, founded by Brian Behlendorf of Apache fame and funded by a stellar group, was contracted by Sun Microsystems to provide the collaborative work environment for what was hailed as the largest open-source project in the world.
No one expected success, at least not on the level that we have seen. There was not even what would count as a valid measure of success, when the project was conceived. Open source held the promise of simplifying software development, of allowing corporations to get to market faster, and of generally improving the code. All these have turned out to be true, albeit with some qualifications (what counts as "get to market"?). But no one anticipated that OpenOffice.org would engage the millions of endusers it has and gain such an enormous following outside USA's borders; and no one anticipated that the infrastructure on which OpenOffice.org runs, an early version of CollabNet's SourceCast, would be able to handle a participant community of 90,000 registered users and developers, working side by side, collaborating trans-nationally.
This paper examines where we stand today in terms of community organization, and involvement. It touches on the present political and technical structure of OpenOffice.org. It then moves on to discuss what the future of the project may look like, from a technological, community, and political perspective (by "political" I mean a politics specific to OpenOffice.org, not the wider world). This paper will be of interest to anyone who is curious as to where OpenOffice.org is going and how it is going to get there.
Biography: I have been helping to lead OpenOffice.org since its inception, in October 2000. As a consultant for CollabNet, which hosts OpenOffice.org and several other Sun OSS sites, I have been able to exploit my academic training and background. I received my PhD in English from the University of California, Berkeley, where I taught courses on nineteenth- and twentieth-century U.S. and British culture. I am at present working on two books, one, a study of the difference corporate-sponsored open-source efforts have made to the open-source milieu, and the other, a refinement of my dissertation.

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What is the difference between OpenOffice.org and StarOffice?
Erwin Tenhumberg Product Marketing Manager, Desktop Solutions Group, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
At trade shows and similar events the most frequently asked question is What is the difference between OpenOffice.org and StarOffice?. The goal of this session is to provide everybody who does marketing for OpenOffice.org with detailed answers to this question. In this session the attendees will learn what differences and similarities exist between StarOffice and OpenOffice.org concerning the functionality as well as the support and service offerings. The presentation will also give a brief overview about other derivative products like RedOffice, KaiOffice or OpenOfficePL.
Biography: Erwin Tenhumberg is a Product Marketing Manager in the Desktop Solutions Group at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Within this group he mainly focusses on the developer aspects of both OpenOffice.org and StarOffice[tm] including the SDK. Erwin started working for Sun as a Systems Engineer in Langen, Germany. There he did pre-sales for various software products including StarOffice and SunRay[tm]. Before Erwin joined Sun he worked for different companies where he did Java consulting, software development and desktop application administration and helpdesk.

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OpenOffice Instituted By Computer Engineering Technology School
John McLafferty Instructor, Computer Engineering Technology, Palliser Campus, Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology, Moose Jaw, SK, Canada, S6H 4R4
I am an instructor in the Computer Engineering Technology Department, Palliser Campus, of the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology in Moose Jaw Saskatchewan, Canada. It is a 5 semester course (4 months/semester) with 3 semesters of work terms. The course is accredited by the Canadian Association of Technicians and Technologists.
The decision was made more than two years ago to teach OpenOffice (StarOffice initially) to all the 1st semester students as an introduction to computer applications. This also requires that the students use OpenOffice when submitting required lab reports and various homework assignments.
The Department was using the WordPerfect Office suite. We were starting to have problems with license and compatibility between versions. In addition, the students were resorting to bootlegged versions of the software for their home computers. The Department goal was to have all the students use the same base software so there would be no problems with some having a spread sheet that didn't work right, and others with spell check problems, and so on.
We had talked about doing something with the course and the software for a while, but because we could see a big job ahead of us, we did what anybody else would do; hope that the college would buy us out for retirement. As it turned out, the decision was made for us. We got a list of the number of students coming into 1st semester and looked at our computer labs. Another lab was needed and we had 3 days and no software budget. The Department had some experience with Linux and I had been using StarOffice from the moment Sun released it. The decision was made; we rolled out StarOffice/OpenOffice and Linux.
None of the horror stories that would be expected from making a total change in office application and operating system software occurred, but we were totally surprised by some of the unexpected things that happened. For example, the initial apathy by the students, and the apprehension of going into a "Microsoft Free Zone" computer lab.
Nothing is harder on a computer lab than 1st semester students who think they know what they are doing. The lab required some attention for the first week with permission and password problems; after that, it was virtually maintenance free.
I plan on adding more open source software (MySQL and PHP) to the 1st semester course next September.
Session Description:
  • Reasons for choosing OpenOffice for use in a high technology course.
  • How Open Office was implemented.
  • Unexpected surprises encountered.
  • Why we would do it again the same way.
Biography: I am an Instructor with the Saskatchewan Institute of Applied Science and Technology in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada. I have been involved with teaching and consulting in the Micro processors, Computers and Software fields since I saw my first 4004 chip. The Computer Engineering Technology department of SIAST, myself, and all the instructors have been proactive in the use of open source software and including this software in our courses. Because of the success that I have had with open source software, I have been promoting its use in other departments within the college and also within education and business in general.

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The OpenOffice.org developer survey - first results, findings and next steps
Erwin Tenhumberg Product Marketing Manager, Desktop Solutions Group, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
Together with the beta release of the OpenOffice.org SDK we started the first developer survey on OpenOffice.org. The goal of the survey is to determine what interest developers have in OpenOffice.org and what tools they prefer for their work. In addition the survey will help to improve the quality of the SDK.
In this session we will have a close look at the first results and try to interpret the different numbers. During the session we will also discuss what questions should be added to future developer surveys. Besides, we will try to draw first conclusions an think about necessary next steps.
Biography: Erwin Tenhumberg is a Product Marketing Manager in the Desktop Solutions Group at Sun Microsystems, Inc. Within this group he mainly focusses on the developer aspects of both OpenOffice.org and StarOffice[tm] including the SDK. Erwin started working for Sun as a Systems Engineer in Langen, Germany. There he did pre-sales for various software products including StarOffice and SunRay[tm]. Before Erwin joined Sun he worked for different companies where he did Java consulting, software development and desktop application administration and helpdesk.

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